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The Journey on Kromelboog

What We’ve Done

We converted our farming to a human herded management style 33 months ago. We are removing all our internal fences, allowing free range across 25,000ha to more than 600 plains game animals (eland, gemsbok, hartebeest, blue and black wildebeest, zebra, springbok and blesbok) and we actively encourage all wildlife.

We welcome all carnivores and persecute no wildlife. We have herders with our livestock 24/7 and place our sheep and cattle in mobile kraals at night – the kraals are moved to degraded spots every 7 days and is a rehabilitation tool on those sites.

The Results of What We’ve Done

In 33 months only one lamb has been lost to a carnivore- a caracal, which was not persecuted and was a result of human error. We have in this time effected a 100 percent weaning average (from a pre-herding 70%), despite a 1:300 year drought we did not supplementary feed and deliver A2 (fat) lambs to market.

Predators are an asset on our farm.

It could not be done until it was done.

We farm ethically and for ecological resilience.

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A Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade AB Mutton Shoulder from the Karoo. This cut has been Fresh Frozen.

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A Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade AB Leg of Mutton from the Karoo. This cut has been Fresh Frozen.

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A rack of Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade AB Ribs from the Karoo. This cut has been Fresh Frozen.

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A Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade AB Stew Pack from the Karoo. (Bone in). Fresh Frozen.

R100

A pack of Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade AB Best End Chops from the Karoo. This cut has been Fresh Frozen.

R405

A Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade A Leg of Lamb from the Karoo. This cut has been Fresh Frozen.

R153R200

A rack of Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade A Lamb Ribs from the Karoo. This cut has been Fresh Frozen.

R60R115

A Wildlife-Friendly, Ethically-Produced, Grade A Lamb Stew Pack from the Karoo. (Bone in). Fresh Frozen.

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A wildlife friendly half mutton meat box, portioned into freezer friendly cuts. Priced at R120/kg, this box is fresh-frozen.

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A wildlife friendly half lamb meat box, portioned into freezer friendly cuts. Priced at R150/kg, this box is fresh-frozen.

11 thoughts on “The Journey on Kromelboog

  1. Clifford Bestall says:

    Are you using the Savory method of grazing. It looks like it and I would be most interested to know more.

    Kind regards,

    Cliff

    • Kevin Tuffin says:

      Hi Cliff

      The short answer is yes, in that the animals are managed to ensure that the veld has short periods of high density grazing, followed by long periods of rest. The aim being to ensure the vitality of the veld, as well as allowing for predators on the land, and managing the livestock such that they are a tool in that endeavor. Given the low rainfall, the recovery periods are long, so typically a specific area of land is only grazed once a year.

      As to whether it is specifically Savory’s method of grazing being used, no, but there’s a much longer answer than that. There are, however, enough similarities for them to be comparable, and both with the overall aim of increasing biodiversity on the land.

      Happy to discuss further.
      Kevin

      • Clifford Bestall says:

        Hi Kevinb,

        Sorry that I missed your comprehensive response. We would love to visit the farm one day as part of a larger project that we’re hoping to promote.

  2. Cheryl Robertson says:

    What you are doing is amazing – so forward thinking, aware and conscious. Thank you for inviting me to like your page – I source only free range, grass fed, ethically reared meats and they are not always easy to find.
    I’m particularly impressed that you encourage wildlife to flourish and don’t shoot them when they happen to take a farmed animal as a meal. As much as that is a loss to you, these poor animals also need to survive and with their habitat getting ever smaller and taken over by farming, they are left with few options.
    We’ll done, Kevin. I salute you!

    • Kevin Tuffin says:

      Hi Cheryl, thanks so much for your encouragement. I’ve only recently been fortunate enough to become involved in the Fair Game story, and as such, I can’t take any credit for the great work that Fair Game and Landmark have been doing for many years. I’ll absolutely pass on your message of support to those who’ve had their shoulder to grindstone over the years.

  3. Melanie de Grooth says:

    This is such an inspiring way to raise your livestock and give space to game at the same time – phenomenal. I can see how this practice works well in South Africa but what about smaller countries like the U.K. – would this be able to work there? I think many of the countries wanting to reduce the number of cows and sheep being reared by 90% are from the EU. The US could definitely institute this way of farming. Anyway, I am so impressed by this and will be buying from your store and visiting when I am next in the area. Thank you for caring about the animals and the the earth!

    • Kevin Tuffin says:

      Hi Melanie, thanks so much for your message of support. The great thing about this, is that it doesn’t rely on reducing livestock numbers (check out our blog post We need MORE, not fewer, sheep and cows where Brad discusses why we shouldn’t reduce the numbers of cows and sheep). There is no reason for livestock production and wildlife to be in conflict with each other, and so this method could (should) be used everywhere. There definitely are similar projects to this in the EU and the US. In France, they’ve recently reintroduced indigenous bears back into some Alpine areas. If a bear is responsible for livestock loss, the farmer is reimbursed for the loss. I’ve read several case studies of farmers in the US using similar practices in order to improve their farmland so that the wildlife can flourish. Unfortunately, although these are taking place, they still seem to be the exception rather than the rule.

      • Melanie de Grooth says:

        Thank you so much for getting back to me about this and for the extra info you have shared – very interesting and so good to know that others are doing this too. I read the post about more cattle and sheep the other day and was fascinated and so pleased to understand why the system you use works but the conventional method causes havoc. Keep up the good work!

  4. Pingback: Ethical and Ecologically Sound Farming Practices – Seeking Balance

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